Water Damage, Radon, and Termites, Oh My!

Can we just be done with the inspections and especially the findings already?  The water damage is real, possibly extensive.  This is on the rental house only, due to cheap leaky skylights in a very nice expensive metal roof.  And because the rental is an efficient “earth house”, it is half buried into the ground…which is damp.  So, Gordon ordered a termite inspection.  And threw in a radon inspection. After all, our current house just underwent a radon inspection, so it must be a sign.  Signs.  Not my favorite things, unless they point me in a happy direction.

Then we got the inspection report for the home we’re selling with ninety million fix-me requests attached. Some legitimate: You want your roof to be fully functional, even if the “dysfunction” was a single shingle overlapping in the wrong direction. Some not so legitimate: The bath tub’s slow drain hasn’t bothered me for five years and Are your children really going to climb up the stove and tip it over? Some downright wrong: No, just no, you never fully drain a pool that has a liner, and for moderately high cyanuric acid? Come on!

Needless to say we were a bit stressed and overwhelmed yesterday. Just have to wait for the official reports back on the new place and address the things on our house without spending a ton.

Mr. and Mrs. C’s Land

Pecans, persimmons, pears, apples, muscadines, and one scraggly little peach tree occupy the property. Mr. C. walked us all around today, identifying so many plants, pointing out where the invisible fence line is (surrounding an impressive 3 acres or so), and giving us what felt like an orientation as he was handing over the keys to the kingdom. This was a home, built, maintained and nourished by one family for forty years. Mr. C. had a quick step and a glow about him as he told stories about the goats they used to have, and mischievously encouraged Eddie and I to bite into a green, mouth-puckering persimmon. Mrs. C greeted Gordon with an embracing handshake and me with a pair of lovely mangoes grown at their new subtropical home. She showed me a picture of their mango tree, the large ripening fruit cleverly covered with socks to discourage grazing squirrels. She told us how they’d been praying that it would be a family to buy their place.

Today, there with the people whose home it actually is, the land felt more mine than it had before.

pear pecan

Boys trying out the place
Boys trying out the place
Workshop
Workshop